NWPA Growers Co-op
<< Back to main

CSA Recipes

Posted 8/16/2018 7:36am by Amy Philson.

Thank you all for your understanding about this newsletter being late.  I know that some of our members never read this, while others anticipate it every week.  It will most likely come later in the day for the next several weeks.  Our driver Heather hurt her back (not doing deliveries), so she is out of commission for a while.  She could use your thoughts and prayers, as she is not a sit-still kind of person and the pain is making her do just that.  I am filling in for her at the moment, so this newsletter will have to wait until evening after I get home from deliveries.

This week has been extra-trying for me because some of my family's closest friends are moving back to California today.  We spent the day with them on Tuesday helping them pack and just hanging out, but that meant a very late night and an early start yesterday.  So by the time I got home from deliveries I was spent and just needed to chill before turning in early.

Farm News

Detweiler Farm

The recent rains and warm weather have been good for the farm crops.  August is often hot and dry, so the rain is welcome.  It is interesting how it can rain at our farm but remain dry just a mile down the road.  Our tomatoes are ripening beautifully.  Fall crops are coming along, with dots of squash among the green vines.  Potato plants are starting to die off, so it will be time to dig the tubers before we know it.

Trunnel Brook Farm

Harvesting beans and peas is very labor-intensive.  This represents a lot of time for the two of us.

Grateful Life Farm

What happened this week?  Oh my goodness, what didn’t happen?  The good things first – our final batch of baby chicks for this season arrived Wednesday afternoon and our newest baby rabbits are healthy and strong. 
Now for the challenging parts.  Our phone wires, inside our house, are not working properly. We’ve made a temporary repair that has given us our phone and internet service back while we work on a permanent solution.  Our ATV is having more mechanical trouble.  I got it so stuck the other morning on the way to feed the chickens that I had to walk back to the house to get a chain fall and hook onto a tree to pull it out.  Now the front wheels are not spinning and the belt is slipping.  Shawn is trying to work his mechanic magic as I write this.
And I discovered I got into some poison ivy, likely in the back pasture or maybe in the woods picking mushrooms.  I’ve never gotten poison ivy before, so I thought I would share some of what I learned, which you may find useful.  First, how do you know you got poison ivy?  The rash started out itchy like mosquito bites, but unlike a mosquito bite, it is not one raised bump, but clusters of tiny blisters that form.  They often form in a line because that is how the plant brushed across your skin. 

I learned that poison oak is not common in our area, and poison sumac is a wetland plant, so most likely poison ivy is the culprit here.  There are many good resources on the internet for learning to identify the plant, but I think it looks similar to wild berry plants, but does not have prickly stems.  The urushiol oil in the plant causes the rash and you can spread the rash to other parts of your body or other people prior to washing it off.  Many people can keep from getting a rash if the oil is washed off within one hour of contact.  Once you have washed off the urushiol oil, if you do get a rash, the fluid from the rash blisters is not contagious and cannot spread the rash.  You can treat it with calamine lotion or if you prefer a natural remedy, try the juice from the leaves and stems of jewelweed.

Amy here:  A funny story from my farm. Several years ago my nephew was visiting for a few days.  My sons and he took a hike through the woods, and the next day he returned home to Michigan.  My sister called me to ask if the boys had been near poison ivy because his whole body was covered with an itchy rash.  I asked my sons, and they said, "Sure...we were sitting in a meadow filled with it in the woods."  Thankfully, my family isn't very sensitive to the oils in poison ivy, because we would have it constantly with the amount of time we spend in the woods. 

Another name for jewelweed is "touch-me-nots" because the little orange flowers that you see now will turn into seed pods that explode when you touch them.

Glacial Till Farm

Baby kale harvest.  Do you recall the photo from last week's newsletter that shows really tiny greens in the beds?  They grow quickly with sun, rain, and warm temperatures!

CSA Shares

Some of you got monster cabbage this week!  I assure you, it is not pumped full of chemical fertilizer.  That variety of cabbage grows large naturally.  It is often used to make sauerkraut.

I was thrilled to see some cantaloupe in the Choice boxes.  I'm sure it was snatched up by the first people there!  We should have enough to put in all the shares next week.  Yum!

Full Share

  • 1 spaghetti squash from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 cabbage from Miller Farm Products
  • 1 lb. tomatoes from Detweiler Farm
  • 4 pickling cukes from Byler Farm
  • 8 oz. arugula from Glacial Till Farm
  • 1 bag sugar snap peas or tricolor beans from Trunnel Brook Farm
  • 1 lb. green beans from Detweiler Farm
  • 2 green peppers from Byler Farm
  • 2 Choice from Detweiler Farm, Miller Farm Products, Grateful Life Farm, Trunnel Brook Farm, Springfield Acres, Byler Farm, and Glacial Till Farm

Small Share

  • 1 spaghetti squash from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 cabbage from Miller Farm Products
  • 1 tomato from Byler Farm
  • 8 oz. baby kale from Glacial Till Farm
  • 1 bag sugar snap peas or tricolor beans from Trunnel Brook Farm
  • 1 lb. green beans from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 green pepper from Byler Farm
  • 1 Choice from Detweiler Farm, Miller Farm Products, Grateful Life Farm, Trunnel Brook Farm, Springfield Acres, Byler Farm, and Glacial Till Farm

Mini Share

  • 1 spaghetti squash from Detweiler Farm
  • 1 tomato from Detweiler Farm
  • 8 oz. salad greens from Glacial Till Farm
  • 1/2 lb. green beans from Miller Farm Products
  • 1 Choice from Detweiler Farm, Miller Farm Products, Grateful Life Farm, Trunnel Brook Farm, Springfield Acres, Byler Farm, and Glacial Till Farm

Recipes

Spaghetti Squash Taco Boats

Spaghetti Squash Chow Mein

Lemon Butter Green Beans

Too many beans?  How to Freeze Fresh Green Beans

Asian-Style Cabbage Wraps

Creamy No-Mayo Coleslaw

Make some sauerkraut with your giant cabbage!  This recipe was recommended by one of our CSA members:  Lemon Dill Sauerkraut

Greek Cucumber and Arugula Salad

Greek Kale Salad with Lemon Olive Oil Dressing

 

Check out our Pinterest page for lots more recipes.  And share how you use your CSA veggies (and meats, too!) on our Facebook page.

Amy

 


Basket of Hope